Graduate Student Manual

 This manual contains graduate student policies and procedures, requirements and resources. The Graduate Studies Support Coordinator updates this manual annually.

Last Updated: June 2017

Table of Contents

FOCUS AND PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES
GRADUATE THESIS, PROJECT AND DISSERTATION INFORMATION
GRADUATE OFFICES AND OFFICE PROCEDURES
CAMPUS & COMMUNITY RESOURCES

FOCUS AND PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Departmental Focus

The focus of the Department of Communication Studies is on the examination, grounded in the rhetorical bases of the discipline, of communication processes and products in three areas:  Media Studies and Visual Culture, Relational and Organizational Communication, and Rhetoric and Civic Engagement.

Code of Ethical Behavior and Values

The faculty of the Department of Communication Studies believes that ethical behavior in all professional endeavors is paramount. As noted in the National Communication Association’s Code of Professional Ethics (http://www.natcom.org/index.asp?bid=13592, accessed July 6, 2009):

Members of the communication discipline have a special responsibility to model ethical communication practices. Communication scholars are particularly concerned with free and responsible communication among all members of society. Ethical communication should begin with ourselves and govern our interactions with others.

We believe that our communication and professional conduct should be guided by honesty, integrity, rigor, prudence, and appreciation of the diversity of ideas and perspectives that contribute to the richness of our community.

Specific guidelines for ethical conduct are outlined in the Code of Ethical Behavior in the Colorado State University Academic Faculty and Administrative Professional Manual section D. 9.

Master of Arts in Communication Studies Program Requirements

 

The Master of Arts in Communication Studies is a two-year program which includes a master’s thesis project.

Core Courses
SPCM 601 History of Rhetorical Theory 3
SPCM 612 Rhetorical Criticism 3
SPCM 638 Communication Research Methods 3
SPCM 639 Communication Theory 3
SPCM 646 Media Theory 3
SPCM 692 Seminar (Introduction to Graduate Studies) 3
SPCM 699 Thesis 6
Electives Take 12 graduate credits (500 and above). At least 9 credits must be SPCM credits. No more than 3 credits from outside the department may be counted toward your M.A. plan of study. 12
Additional Courses for GTAs
SPCM 675 Speech Communication Pedagogy 3
SPCM 684 Supervised College Teaching 3
Total Credits 36-42

Sample Course Rotation

Year 1 Fall Semester Year 1 Spring Semester
SPCM 601 SPCM 612
SPCM 646 SPCM 638
SPCM elective SPCM elective
SPCM 675 SPCM 684
SPCM 692
Year 2 Fall Semester Year 2 Spring Semester
SPCM 639 SPCM elective or outside elective
SPCM elective SPCM 699
SPCM 699

Plan A Thesis

All Plan A graduate students are required to write a thesis under the supervision of a graduate advisor and thesis committee. Students must follow the Graduate School’s guidelines and requirements for master’s theses. Below are departmental policies and guidelines.

Thesis Committee

Each thesis committee has at least three members, two from within the department and one from outside the department. The chair of the committee must have a Ph.D. and be a member of the graduate faculty. The chair works with the student to select the outside member.

No faculty member shall chair more than two M.A. theses in one year. No faculty shall serve as a chair or an inside member on more than four thesis committees. Faculty with joint appointments will chair and serve as inside members in proportion to their commitments to the department.

No thesis committee commitments will be made by faculty or M.A. students before the last weekday of February.

Thesis process

All Plan A graduate students must write and defend a prospectus. This defense is expected to occur during the fall semester of the student’s second year. The thesis committee must evaluate the prospectus for the purposes of departmental assessment; the evaluation form is found at S:\Forms.

All drafts of thesis work, once they are approved by the chair and the student, must go to the inside member before being presented to the outside member. Once the inside member is satisfied, the draft then goes to the outside member.

The outside member must have a minimum of two weeks to review the final draft of the thesis (approved by the chair and inside member) before the final defense of the thesis takes place. A student can present the outside member with the final draft (approved by the chair and inside member) and schedule a defense two weeks from the date of delivery.  Students should not request a quicker turnaround time from outside members—it’s bad form, indicates poor planning on the student’s part, and could make it more difficult for future students to secure outside members for their committees.

Response or turn-times for drafts of work should be arranged by the chair, student, and inside member. Please note, though, that the department sets as its normal turn-time for a draft of a chapter as two weeks.

Graduate students must pay tuition for all regular (fall and spring) semesters until they graduate. If they do not successfully defend their thesis in their second year, they must enroll in continuous registration credits each fall and spring until they graduate. Students must be enrolled (in regular or continuous registration credits) during the semester in which they graduate. So, if a student plans to defend in the summer, they must register for continuous registration credits in the summer.

A student who has successfully defended their thesis and presents a bound copy to the Department along with receipts for copying/binding will be reimbursed up to $50.

Additional Requirements

M.A. students must submit a research paper to a scholarly conference and participate in departmental research colloquia and conference preparation sessions.

M.A. in Communication, Deliberative Practices Specialization

The Master of Arts in Communication Studies, Deliberative Practices Specialization is a two-year program in which students work closely with our nationally-recognized Center for Public Deliberation and are trained to design and facilitate deliberative dialogues. Interested students apply for the Deliberative Practices Specialization during the fall of their first semester in the program. Admission into this track must be approved by the Director of the CPD.

Required Curriculum

Core
SPCM 408 Applied Deliberative Techniques 3
SPCM 508 Deliberative Theory and Practice 3
SPCM 601 History of rhetorical theory 3
SPCM 612 Rhetorical Criticism 3
SPCM 638 Communication Research Methods 3
SPCM 639 Communication Theory 3
SPCM 646 Media Theory 3
SPCM 692 Seminar (Introduction to Graduate Studies) 3
SPCM 686 Practicum 3
SPCM 695 Independent Study 3
Electives Take 9 graduate credits (500 and above). At least 6 credits must be SPCM credits. No more than 3 credits from outside the department may be counted toward your M.A. plan of study. 9
Additional Courses for GTAs
SPCM 675 Speech Communication Pedagogy 3
SPCM 684 Supervised College Teaching 3
Total Credits 39-45

Sample Course Rotation

Year 1 Fall Semester Year 1 Spring Semester
SPCM 601 SPCM 612
SPCM 646 SPCM 638
SPCM 408 SPCM 508
SPCM 675 SPCM 684
SPCM 692
Year 2 Fall Semester Year 2 Spring Semester
SPCM 639 SPCM elective
SPCM elective SPCM 695
SPCM 686 SPCM elective or outside elective

Additional Requirements

M.A. students in the Deliberative Practices Specialization must complete an applied research project under the supervision of a graduate committee, submit a research paper to a scholarly conference, and participate in departmental research colloquia and conference preparation sessions.Additional Requirements

Applied Research Project Process

All Plan B graduate students must complete an applied research project that is supervised by a graduate faculty member with expertise in deliberation, and a graduate committee comprised of one additional member from inside the department and one faculty member from outside the department. Requirements for the applied research project are more flexible than those for a master’s thesis. Students may complete a project independently, or they may contribute to the ongoing research of the CPD. Plan B students should prepare and defend a prospectus or research project plan during the fall semester of their second year. Additional requirements and project outcomes will be determined by the student’s advisor in consultation with the full committee.

Note: students in either track may take SPCM 508 and be affiliated with the Center for Public Deliberation. The Deliberative Practices Specialization is designed for those who want to emphasize public deliberation and work extensively with the CPD.

Ph.D. In Communication Program Requirements

Ph.D. in Communication

The Ph.D. in Communication is a three-year program with the following requirements:

Master Degree Credit Students must have earned an M.A. in communication or a related field. Up to 27 credits may be accepted
toward the Ph.D. As part of those 27 credits, the following Ph.D. prerequisite courses should be included.
If the student did not take one or more courses equivalent to the following Ph.D. prerequisites, those courses
must be included on the Ph.D. program of study. Those courses must be taken in addition to the 54 credits
required for the Ph.D.
27
SPCM 601 History of Rhetorical Theory
SPCM 612 Rhetorical Criticism
SPCM 638 Communication Research Methods
SPCM 639 Communication Theory
SPCM 646 Media Theory
SPCM 675 Speech Communication Pedagogy
Ph.D. Core
SPCM 701 Seminar in Academic Writing 3
SPCM 702 Professional Writing and Public Scholarship 3
SPCM 712 Critical/Cultural Analysis in Communication 3
SPCM 793 Seminar: Communication Research Methods 3
SPCM 798 Research (qualifying exams) 6
SPCM 799 Dissertation 12
Electives Take 24 graduate credits (500 and above). No more than 6 credits from outside the department may be
counted toward your Ph.D. plan of study. The plan of study must be approved by the student’s committee,
and students may not make changes without their advisor’s approval.
24
Total Credits 81

Sample Course Rotation

Year 1 Fall Semester Year 1 Spring Semester
SPCM 701 SPCM 702
SPCM elective SPCM elective
SPCM elective SPCM elective or outside elective
Year 2 Fall Semester  Year 2 Spring Semester
SPCM 712 SPCM 793
SPCM Elective SPCM Elective
SPCM elective or outside elective SPCM elective
 Year 3 Fall Semester  Year 3 Spring Semester
 SPCM 798 (6 credits)  SPCM 799 (9 credits)
 SPCM 799 (3 credits)

Notes on Curricular Requirements

Advanced Research Methods: Given the increasing importance of multi-methodological research inside and outside of academe, we want our Ph.D. graduates to be experts in a variety of research methods. We require all students to take advanced research methods courses grounded in both social science and critical/humanistic perspectives.

Advanced Writing: Given our program’s emphasis on engagement, we want our Ph.D. graduates to be able to write successfully for scholarly and lay audiences. Our Ph.D. core includes instruction in academic and professional writing, as well as in adapting scholarly information for extra-disciplinary and lay audiences (e.g. public scholarship, scholarly blogging, digital engagement, etc.).

Elective Courses: Doctoral students choose graduate electives from the department in consultation with their advisor. Our program is designed to serve students who appreciate our programmatic breadth and flexibility. Students will need to choose electives from more than one of our areas of study.

Qualifying Exams and Dissertation: Doctoral students’ third year is devoted to the qualifying exam and dissertation process. Students whose dissertation research extends beyond the third year may register for continuous registration credits until they complete their dissertation.

Conference Submission and Departmental Colloquia: Ph.D. students must submit their research to and engage in professional development at scholarly conferences. They also must participate in departmental research colloquia and conference preparation sessions.

Graduate Elective Courses for M.A. and Ph.D.

he following graduate elective courses are currently being offered and are available to students in any track:

  • SPCM 508 Deliberative Theory and Practice
  • SPCM 538 Relating & Organizing for Health
  • SPCM 604 Rhetoric of Everyday Life
  • SPCM 611 Topics in Public Address
  • SPCM 620 Rhetoric and Public Affairs
  • SPCM 623 Feminist Theories of Discourse
  • SPCM 632 Theories of Interpersonal Communication
  • SPCM 633 Discourse, Work, and Organization
  • SPCM 634 Communication and Cultural Diversity
  • SPCM 647 Media Industries
  • SPCM 648 Media Texts
  • SPCM 549 Media Audiences
  • SPCM 649 Media Audiences
  • SPCM 650 Contemporary Issues in Media
  • SPCM 792A Topics in Rhetoric and Civic Engagement
  • SPCM 792B Topics in Relational and Organizational Communication
  • SPCM 792C Topics in Media and Visual Culture

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GRADUATE PROGRAM POLICIES

GTA Teaching

Graduate Teaching Assistantships allows graduate student the opportunity to gain teaching experience, cover student tuition, and provide a monthly stipend. To learn more please refer to the Department website: http://communicationstudies.colostate.edu/grad/graduate-teaching-assistantships/

Graduate teaching assistants in the M.A. program are assigned to teach three or four courses per year. Generally those are one section of SPCM 200 Public Speaking during the first semester, two sections during the second semester, two sections during the third semester, and one or two section(s) during the fourth semester.  Some graduate teaching assistants may assist in large sections (75 students or more) of undergraduate courses, in which case their teaching load is reduced by one section of SPCM 200. Graduate students who wish to assist in courses without a course reduction may do so with the approval of the instructor. They may receive SPCM 684 Supervised College Teaching credit for this activity.  GTA mentoring is done by the Director of the Basic Public Speaking Course.

Doctoral graduate teaching assistants will teach four courses per year. Generally, doctoral students who are new to the department will begin by teaching SPCM 200: Public Speaking. As they advance in the program, doctoral students may have opportunities to teach additional courses in the undergraduate core curriculum (SPCM 100: Communication and Pop Culture; SPCM 130: Relational and Organizational Communication, and SPCM 207: Public Argumentation), and advanced undergraduate courses. Teaching assignments are determined by the Department Chair and courses will be assigned according to departmental need.

Conference Submission

Graduate students are required to submit one research project for presentation at a scholarly convention and are encouraged to submit additional papers/panels. Students must also keep track of all conference submissions and outcomes and report that information to the Graduate Studies Support Coordinator. Travel assistance may be available to graduate students presenting research at a conference. If funding is awarded, students must follow departmental and university procedures for documentation of eligible expenses.

Travel Procedures

All travel must conform to University travel regulations and procedures. Please see Dawn McConkey for assistance with appropriate travel forms and instructions.

 

Graduate Student Satisfactory Academic Performance and Satisfactory Progress

Students are expected to meet two standards in their course of study:

  • Satisfactory Performance refers to the requirement of minimum grade performance in course work, and fulfilling the expectations and requirements associated with the prospectus, thesis, and/or major research project.
  • Satisfactory Progress refers to the speed and timeliness of progression through the program.

A student whose performance or progress is not satisfactory is subject to dismissal from the program, and, in general, must petition to remain in the program. Even in instances in which the petition process is waived or petitions are approved, students are expected to get back on schedule to meet satisfactory progress standards or to petition to reschedule their academic time line. Students are responsible for discussing with their academic advisers, and bringing to the attention of the Director of Graduate Studies, any circumstances that will prevent their meeting academic progress standards.

Students funded on Graduate Assistantships are held to additional Satisfactory Performance standards, and may have the Satisfactory Progress standards more strictly enforced. The department must assure that assistantship funds are being invested in high-performing students who are progressing efficiently through the program requirements.

Satisfactory Performance Standards
Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average across all Communication Studies courses, a 3.0 grade point average across all regular courses, and a 3.0 GPA in all regular and non-regular courses combined. Regular courses are distinct from independent or group study, thesis credits, study abroad, supervised college teaching, internships, or any courses graded on a pass/fail basis. Failure to meet the minimum GPA requirements will result in academic probation and, if not rectified, dismissal from the program.

Students funded on Graduate Teaching Assistantships must meet the requirements above; in addition, a grade below B in any required course will trigger a review of the student’s overall record and of whether continuation of support is merited.

Graduate students must pass the prescribed set of preliminary examinations. M.A. students must successfully defend their thesis prospectus or research project proposal. Ph.D. students must successfully defend their written and oral qualifying exam. Only two attempts are allowed for each exam. Two failures on an exam will lead to dismissal from the program.  Both M.A. and Ph.D. students must successfully defend their thesis/research project/dissertation and fulfill all other degree requirements in order for degree conferral.

Satisfactory Progress Standards

M.A. Students

  • Graduate students are expected to familiarize themselves with and follow the required procedures, forms, and deadlines posted on the graduate school website.
  • In general, graduate students are expected to take at least nine credits of core or elective courses each semester in their first year. In some semesters, independent study or practicum credits may be approved in place of a regular course.
  • M.A. students are expected to identify a thesis or research project advisor in March or April of their first year. The rest of the committee should be comprised, in consultation with their advisor, by the end of the spring semester their first year.
  • Plan A M.A. students are expected to defend their thesis prospectus during fall semester of their second year. Plan B M.A. students are expected to consult with their advisor regarding their research project and agree upon a project plan.
  • M.A. students are expected to complete their thesis/research project by the end of spring semester their second year. Faculty members are generally not available to do thesis/research project defenses during the summer.
  • Students who fail to complete degree requirements on time should be mindful of the Graduate School’s time limit for completion of graduate degrees, explained in the Graduate Bulletin as follows: There is a ten-year time limit for completion of the master’s or doctoral degrees. Courses to be applied toward fulfilling the requirements for the master’s and doctoral degrees, including any which may have been transferred from another institution, must have been registered for and completed within the 10 years immediately preceding the date of completion of requirements for the degrees.

Ph.D. Students

  • Graduate students are expected to familiarize themselves with and follow the required procedures, forms, and deadlines posted on the graduate school website.
  • In general, graduate students are expected to take at least nine credits of core or elective courses each semester until all course work has been completed. In some semesters, independent study or practicum credits may be approved in place of a regular course. Students who are privately funded and are pursuing the degree on a part-time basis may follow a plan approved by their advisor and on file with the department.
  • Before the end of the advising period the second semester, Ph.D. students must have filed with the department a written semester-by-semester course plan including elective courses they plan to take and in which semester they plan to take their qualifying exam, approved by their advisor. This is an early draft of the official Plan of Study, which must be submitted to the Graduate School no later than the deadline specified by the Graduate School. Ph.D. students should generally take their qualifying exam during their 5th semester. The time frame may change if the student has to complete several Ph.D. prerequisite courses. A student failing the exam must retake it at the next opportunity. Failing to attempt the exam according to schedule counts as a Fail, unless an exception has been approved by the Director of Graduate Studies and Department Chair.

While it is understood that the speed of dissertation research progress will vary according to the nature of the work and other circumstances, students are expected to make continuous, substantial progress to the Preliminary Oral Examination (dissertation proposal) and then through the remainder of their research and writing, to the Final Oral Examination (final defense), then any follow-up revisions, and submission of the dissertation in accordance with university and department requirements. Students should be aware of the “10 Year Rule” imposed by the Graduate School, as stated in the Graduate Bulletin as follows:

There is a 10-year time limit for completion of the master’s or doctoral degrees. Courses to be applied toward fulfilling the requirements for the master’s and doctoral degrees, including any which may have been transferred from another institution, must have been registered for and completed within the ten years immediately preceding the date of completion of requirements for the degrees.

Petition Process
Students who cannot meet the satisfactory progress standards may at any time ask their academic adviser to co-sign a petition to the Chair, to reschedule their academic time line in light of their specific situations. This petition will be reviewed by the Chair and the Director of Graduate Studies. Such petitions may involve an extension of the time period in which the student is expected to complete the degree. This may apply to students who want to pursue a graduate degree on a part-time basis or who want to take a leave of absence from graduate study. Such students should also consult the Graduate and Professional Bulletin for Graduate School requirements for continuous enrollment, readmission, and time limits.

Determining Authorship in Student-Faculty Collaborations

When publishing with a student, the faculty member should outline their personal policies and procedures as soon in the process as possible. The student should feel free to ask questions, negotiate, and/or find another writing partner as needed.  The authorship relationship may change over time, for example as the student and faculty member realize that the student can indeed contribute substantially to the project (not just as a research assistant) and, vice-versa, if the student ends up limiting his or her contributions to the preliminary stages of the project.

  1. If the publication is from an M.A. thesis where little additional effort from the faculty member has been provided other than working on the document as advisor, the student should include a note of thanks and acknowledgement that the work is from the thesis and that the thesis was directed by Dr. Said Faculty.
  1. If the publication is from an M.A. thesis where additional work, such as theoretical and/or methodological enhancements, additional data, additional criticism or interpretations, and/or more detailed work to structure and organize ideas, has been conducted by a faculty member and this work has been extended significantly beyond the work completed by the student, then the faculty member may have second author status.
  1. If a student has assisted a faculty member in her/his research, such as gathering research materials, inputting data, and carrying out statistical data analysis, the student should be thanked for their assistance in the note of thanks.
  1. If a student has made an important creative and intellectual contribution to a faculty member’s work, such as providing theoretical enhancements, developing the research design, contributing to data analysis decisions, interpreting results, and/or contributing to the structure and form of the faculty member’s initial work, the student should receive second author status.
  1. If a student and faculty member begin a new project jointly and each has an equitable level of responsibility in the entire project, the student and faculty member should share co-author status. While names may appear in an agreed upon order or alphabetically, a note should indicate that both authors contributed equally to the essay. If the student and faculty member make different levels of contribution, they should determine the order of authorship based on those levels of contribution.
  1. If a student begins a paper in class, the student should be urged to publish the paper on her/his own with little additional contribution from the faculty member beyond the usual level of feedback provided on class papers, in which case a note of thanks to the faculty member should be included. If the student does not want, or is unable, to publish on their own, then the student and faculty member may share co-author status assuming that the faculty member makes a significant contribution to the final work.

Funding Limits for Internally Funded Students

M.A. students who receive graduate teaching assistantships are generally offered 2 years of 9-month funding, provided they are fulfilling academic performance and progress expectations, as well as following all departmental policies and procedures in the classroom and meeting departmental expectations for teaching. If a student is unable or unwilling to fulfill expectations and, consequently, loses their assistantship, funding is not guaranteed for future semesters.

Ph.D. students who receive graduate teaching assistantships are generally offered 3 years of 9-month funding, provided they are fulfilling academic performance and progress expectations, as well as following all departmental policies and procedures in the classroom and meeting departmental expectations for teaching. Ph.D. students may be eligible for special faculty appointments after their GTA funding expires, depending on departmental needs. If a student is unable or unwilling to fulfill expectations and, consequently, loses their assistantship, funding is not guaranteed for future semesters.

Students not funded by the department who expect to apply for funding at a later time should be aware that their performance in relation to the progress standards would be a factor in the department’s consideration of their subsequent applications for funding.

Graduate School Paperwork

The responsibility for meeting deadlines, requirements, and completing Graduate School paperwork/forms is solely that of the students. Second and third years should pay particular attention to the email from the Grad School in the spring concerning their application for graduation. Graduate students are encouraged to work with the Graduate Studies Support Coordinator on meeting deadlines, requirements and obtaining residency.

Establishing Residency

For graduate students seeking residency,  please visit the Office of Financial Aid website and follow the instructions and deadline dates carefully: http://financialaid.colostate.edu/petition-process-and-deadlines.

Graduate School Policies and Procedures

Please refer to the Graduate and Professional Bulletin for current policies and procedures: http://catalog.colostate.edu/general-catalog/graduate-bulletin/

You can access the frequently referenced policies, such as health insurance, advisor and committee requirements, and university policy resources here: http://graduateschool.colostate.edu/policies-and-procedures/

Graduate Forms and Steps to Graduation

Please refer to the Graduate School website for all graduate forms and instructions: http://graduateschool.colostate.edu/policies-and-procedures/forms/

Steps to Graduation are listed for both M.A. and Ph.D. students on the Graduate School website:

http://graduateschool.colostate.edu/for-current-students/completing-your-degree/steps-to-your-masters-degree/

http://graduateschool.colostate.edu/for-current-students/completing-your-degree/steps-to-your-Ph.D.-degree/

Please check these sites often to ensure your forms are submitted correctly and on time. You can find current deadline dates here: http://graduateschool.colostate.edu/policies-and-procedures/deadline-dates/

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GRADUATE THESIS, PROJECT, AND DISSERTATION INFORMATION

M.A. in Communication Studies
M.A. candidates must write and complete a master’s thesis.

M.A. in Communication Studies, Deliberative Practices Specialization
M.A. candidates must complete an applied research project supervised by faculty experts in public deliberation.

Ph.D. in Communication
A doctoral student’s third year is devoted to the qualifying exam and dissertation process and all Ph.D. candidates must write and complete a dissertation.

Guidelines for Format, Forms, and Submission

Department prospectus and final defense forms can be found here:

Students must have their advisor print off and bring these forms (or the student must print the form and bring them) to each defense. After the defense the form must be filled out and singed by all three committee members and returned to the Graduate Studies Support Coordinator for recording purposes.

Please pay close attentions to the forms required for thesis/dissertation examinations, the GS24, GS30 and, if you need to change a committee member, GS9. Ph.D. Candidates must also complete a preliminary exam and fill out a GS16.  The preliminary exam must be completed at least two semesters prior to the Ph.D. student’s final examination/defense. To learn more about these please reference the forms section on The Graduate School website: http://graduateschool.colostate.edu/policies-and-procedures/forms/

Prior to starting your thesis please review the formatting guidelines.  Thesis/Dissertation pages for formatting requirements. After your thesis is complete submit it electronically to ProQuest/UMI. Your document must be approved for formatting prior to the deadline date of the semester that you intend to complete your degree requirements. Corrections to your thesis/dissertation may be required so it is recommended that you submit well in advance of the deadline date.

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GRADUATE OFFICES AND OFFICE PROCEDURES

Graduate Offices

Please keep your office locked at all times when you’re not there, and be responsible for locking desks and doors and otherwise ensuring the safety of the equipment in the building. Unfortunately, theft is a problem on campus, so these precautions are necessary.

Office Procedures

Large Conference Room
The large conference room is A217 Behavioral Sciences Building. Sign-up sheet for use of the large conference room is in the work room, and sign-up takes priority over any ad hoc requests.

Small Conference Room/Library
The small conference room/library is inside A208 Behavioral Sciences Building. Priority use goes to GTA and instructor meetings with students.

Copying
The copier in the work room can be used for printing, photocopying, and scanning. Handouts for classes can be scanned and posted to Canvas to reduce departmental copying costs.

Equipment and Supplies
The Department has equipment available for checkout.  You should reserve any equipment on the sheets provided on the clip board in the work room.

All departmental equipment is to be checked out for short-term use only.  When you sign out a camera, laptop, or whatever on the sign-out sheet in the work room, please list the actual times you will have the equipment and your name and return the equipment when it is not actually in use.

If you need a piece of equipment for a longer term, such as a trip during which you’ll be doing research and videoing something, please indicate when you’ll have it back when you sign it out, and return it promptly when you’ve returned.

Mail and Work Room
Mail is distributed in the work room. To post mail, leave it in the slot marked “outgoing mail” on the shelves in the mailbox unit.  Mail is picked up and delivered by the university once per day.

It is against university regulations to mail personal, stamped mail through the campus mail system. You must take it to a U.S. mail center. You may not send personal mail in university envelopes.  Likewise, the use of the university mail-handling system for receiving personal mail is discouraged.

The Work Room must remain locked if not occupied.

Break Room
Faculty and graduate students are welcome to use the microwave, refrigerator, etc. located in the break room. However, the custodians do not clean the break room, so everyone shares in the responsibility of keeping the room and the equipment, sink, etc. clean. Please do not leave mugs, tea bags, coffee, or other personal items sitting on the counters or the tables.

Who’s Responsible for What

 

Classroom equipment problems Classroom Media
Copying Office staff
Computer problems Email: helplibarts@colostate.edu
Department policy Dr. Greg Dickinson
Forms: Internships, independent Study, supervised college teaching Office staff
Graduate advising Dr. Karrin Anderson
Human Resources Gloria Blumanhourst
Keys Dawn McConkey
Supplies Dawn McConkey
Policy on use of supplies Dr. Greg Dickinson
SPCM 200 Dr. Tom Dunn
Textbook and desk copy order Office staff
Undergraduate advising Academic Support Coordinators Ella Bowers, Neely O’Connor /Dr. Greg Dickinson

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CAMPUS AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

Campus Resources

Professional Development for Graduate Students
Discover resources and participate in our professional development events to polish your skills and enhance your career goals: http://graduateschool.colostate.edu/professionaldevelopment/

Campus Dining Options
To learn about dining options at Colorado State University including RamCard and university dining halls and menus, http://housing.colostate.edu/dining and http://housing.colostate.edu/ramcard

Career Center
Located in the basement of the Lory Student Center, the Career Center hosts several events and workshops throughout the year. Learn more: https://career.colostate.edu/

College of Liberal Arts
Communication Studies is one of 13 departments within the College of Liberal Arts. Comm Studies has more undergraduate majors than any other CLA department. Dr. Ben Withers is the dean of the college. He began his appointment in the fall of 2016. You can get to know other departments through the CLA website: http://libarts.colostate.edu/

CSU Health Network
Everything you need to know about staying healthy in body and mind during your time as a Ram: http://health.colostate.edu/

 CSU Police Department: http://police.colostate.edu/

Legal Services
http://sls.colostate.edu/ provides free legal advice to fee-paying students on a variety of legal matters.

Lory Student Center
CSU’s hub of student life and your one stop shop for coffee, lunch, supplies, computer software and equipment, CSU Bookstore, CSU-branded clothing, student activities, Recycled Cycles, and much more: http://lsc.colostate.edu/

Student Resources and Campus Life
Quick links to campus life resources: http://catalog.colostate.edu/general-catalog/academic-services-support/resources-campus-life/#campus-activities

Tell Someone Campaign
If you are concerned about a student OR an employee, tell someone: http://supportandsafety.colostate.edu/tellsomeone

Parking and Transportation Services
http://pts.colostate.edu/

Parking
It is expensive and time-consuming to park on campus. However, it’s doable. If you must drive, explore your options:

Transportation
Biking
Colorado State University received platinum-level “Bicycle Friendly University” status from the League of American Cyclists in fall 2016. From bicycle-designated paths and a city bus system that supports bikes, to commuter showers and conveniently located bicycle racks, commuting to campus by bicycle is about as easy as it can get. Learn more: http://pts.colostate.edu/transportation-options/bicycle-general/

Around the Horn
Free on-campus transit: http://pts.colostate.edu/transportation-options/transit-general/horn/

Public Transit
All students receive a Transfort transit pass (on their Ramcard) included in their student fees thanks to the commitment from the Associated Students of Colorado State University. You can ride any Transfort route in the city, via bus or MAX.  Your transit pass can also get you to Loveland, Longmont and Boulder via the FLEX. Learn more: http://www.ridetransfort.com/

University Center for the Arts
The UCA houses the School of Music, Theatre and Dance and is located on Remington St, just east of College Ave. Many music performances are free to students and those that required a paid ticket are offered at a low student rate. Schedule of performances: http://smtd.colostate.edu/events/

Community Resources

City of Fort Collins
https://www.fcgov.com/

Downtown Fort Collins Business Association
For events, dining, nightlife, shopping, services and arts and culture: http://downtownfortcollins.com/

Fort Collins Chamber of Commerce
Area businesses: https://fortcollinschamber.com/

Larimer County
http://www.co.larimer.co.us/

Visit Fort Collins
Official visitor guide to Fort Collins – where to eat and drink, what to do, community calendar: http://www.visitftcollins.com/?utm_source=visitforttcollins.com

The following local activities and places come highly recommended:

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