Great faculty & start of the semester!

I hope all is well! Here we are at the end of week one of Spring 2017. While it has been just a tad nutty in the front office (mostly trying to accommodate an extraordinary number of students), my sense is that this first week has gone very well. That’s down to the hard work all of you are doing.

I have, as always, good news to share.

I am thrilled to announce the Meara Faw—assistant professor at Rutgers with her PhD from University of Washington—has accepted our offer. She will join us in the fall as our anchor in quantitative methods and as our expert in interpersonal communication.

I am just so thrilled with the faculty—all of the faculty—here in the department. But just take a look at our most recent hires in particular. We have added Carolin Aronis—PhD from the University of Tel Aviv—to teach Gender and Communication. Ellie—PhD University of Utah—teaching all sorts of things and with an essay appearing soon in a Visual Communication (or is it Visual Communication Quarterly). Usama—MFA University of Colorado—who is teaching SPCM 100 and film classes.

And of course Allison, Kit, and Evan all of whom had amazing first semesters in the classroom and in scholarship.

Or what about Ziyu? She has two new essays published. Here they are (and I want to point out that the third author on the Comm Ed essay is an alumna of our MA program—that’s cool too, right?).

Long, Z. (2016). A feminist ventriloquial analysis of “Hao Gongzuo”(good work): Politicizing Chinese Post80s women’s constructions of meanings of work. Women’s Studies in Communication, 39, 422-441. doi: 10.1080/07491409.2016.1224991

Linabary, J.R., Long, Z., Mouton, A., Rao, R.L., Buzzanell, P.M. (published online). Embracing tensions in feminist organizational communication pedagogies. Communication Education. doi: 10.1080/03634523.2016.1257818.

I hope all of you have a wonderful weekend. For me, catching up from a few days of annual leave here in the office. Oh, and I will likely wash and trim Panda. She has gotten far, far too fuzzy.

Yours,
Greg