“A Critical History of Chinese Film Remakes: From Shanghai to Hong Kong to Beijing and Beyond”

Scott Diffrient’s article published in Quarterly Review of Film and Video Professor Scott Diffrient has published the article “A Critical History of Chinese Film Remakes: From Shanghai to Hong Kong to Beijing and Beyond” in Quarterly Review of Film and Video. Excerpt: As James Aston and Lin Feng point out in the Introduction of their recently published […]

“Beyond bad hombres, mamacitas, and borders: Rethinking representation of Mexicanidad in 2017 animation Coco”

Dr. Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager & Emily Dosch’s paper published in Communication, Culture, and Critique Associate Professor Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager and M.A. student Emily Dosch have published the paper “Beyond bad hombres, mamacitas, and borders: Rethinking representation of Mexicanidad in 2017 animation Coco” in the latest issue of Communication, Culture, and Critique. Abstract: The release of Coco in […]

“The banality of World War ‘Z'”

Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager’s article published in EuropeNow Along with coauthor Evgeniya Pyatovskaya—a Ph.D. Candidate at South Florida University—Associate Professor Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager has published the article “The banality of World War ‘Z’” in EuropeNow as part of their series on the Ukraine Crisis. Excerpt: As Russia’s aggression endures in Ukraine and the West has punished Russia with […]

“‘Homicidal Hams’ and ‘Psycho Clowns’: Serial Killer Humour in American Television Comedies”

Scott Diffrient’s chapter published in new book Serial Killing on Screen: Adaptation, True Crime and Popular Culture Professor and Programming Director for the ACT Human Rights Film Festival Scott Diffrient has published the chapter “‘Homicidal Hams’ and ‘Psycho Clowns’: Serial Killer Humour in American Television Comedies” in the new book Serial Killing on Screen: Adaptation, […]

“High reliability organizing through an extended crisis: A case study of a U.S. university during COVID-19”

Elizabeth Williams’s paper published in Journal of Applied Communication Research Along with coauthors Jody Donovan, Laura Giles, and David McKelfresh, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies Elizabeth Williams has published the paper “High reliability organizing through an extended crisis: A case study of a U.S. university during COVID-19” in Journal of Applied Communication Research. […]

“Angloscene: Compromised Personhood in Afro-Chinese Translations”

Jay Ke-Schutte’s new book published by University of California Press Postdoctoral fellow in the CSU Departments of Communication Studies and Anthropology Dr. Jay Ke-Schutte’s book Angloscene: Compromised Personhood in Afro-Chinese Translations is being published in February 2023. Angloscene is available for preorder now. About the book: Angloscene examines Afro-Chinese interactions within Beijing’s aspirationally cosmopolitan student class. […]

Professor Martín Carcasson interviewed on the Follow-up Question podcast

Martín Carcasson interviewed on Michael Ashford’s Follow-up Question podcast: “Solving our most wicked problems together at the local level” On October 31, 2022, professional communicator and marketing executive Michael Ashford interviewed Professor Martín Carcasson on his podcast, The Follow-up Question. In the episode, “Solving our most wicked problems together at the local level,” Carcasson discusses […]

“Alexander Nevsky of Russia, Reanimated and Repurposed”

Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager’s essay published in the Wilson Center’s Russia File Along with coauthor Anya Free, Associate Professor Julia Khrebtan-Hörhager has published the paper “Alexander Nevsky of Russia, Reanimated and Repurposed” in the Wilson Center’s Russia File, a blog of the Kennan Institute. Excerpt: “In September 2022, Alexander Beglov, the governor of St. Petersburg, visited the […]

“Comic Drunks, Crazy Cults, and Lovable Monsters: Bad Behavior on American Television”

Scott Diffrient’s new book published by Syracuse University Press Professor and Programming Director for the ACT Human Rights Film Festival Scott Diffrient has published the book Comic Drunks, Crazy Cults, and Lovable Monsters: Bad Behavior on American Television. About the book: Contradictory to its core, the sitcom—an ostensibly conservative, tranquilizing genre—has a long track record […]